After interviewing C-suite execs from Fortune 500 companies, Deloitte discovered that CMOs tend to disadvantage themselves through a lack of confidence when they engage with their peers.

It seems that CMOs evaluate their own performance far more poorly than their peers do.

This lack of confidence may be keeping CMOs from taking more responsibility in the organisation.

Perhaps that’s what also leads to a shortage of collaboration with other C-Suite roles.

In an interview published in The Drum, CMOs-turned-CEOs shared their insights on how marketing leaders can build up their confidence and shoot for the corner office.

A CMO lives in a land of uncertainty and spends the days predicting trends, spotting opportunities and delivering work that has the purpose of inspiring the future.

Everything in marketing can’t be measured with the same degree of granularity and CMOs need to balance what they know from experience with the objective data in order to make better decisions.

The ability to have confidence in limited data and to be able to connect the dots in a way that energises people into delivering solutions that work isn’t an easy task.

Previous evidence doesn’t predict future success across the business and every move can be a real gamble.

As a marketing leader, you have the ability to drive real change.

Championing the voice of the customer, finding new markets and generating demand are exactly the skills that make or break a brand.

Deloitte also has some advice on what CMOs need to do to for their self-confidence to be justified:

“CMOs must actively contribute in strategic discussions – by demonstrating ownership of key competencies, speaking the common language of the C-suite, and collaborating effectively with their C-Suite peers.”Go on, you can do it! 💪

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