The gaming industry is booming with no end in sight.

And some are even ready to strike unlikely partnerships to grow their piece of the pie.

After struggling to grow its user base, Microsoft announced last week that it’ll be shutting down Mixer and sending its users (mega-stars not included) to Facebook Gaming with future plans to integrate xCloud to the platform as well. 

That’s a big deal for Facebook which has been trailing behind Twitch and YouTube, so far.

Twitch and YouTube have their own big plays in the pipeline too.

YouTube started this year by snatching Activision esports. This move could give Google the leg up it needs over Twitch.

And Twitch has been working on streaming live sports events with its own flair.

With major sports events on hold, both organisers and fans have been flocking to Twitch. This marriage of convenience has taught both worlds some valuable lessons.

E-sports is a new frontier. Even for marketers familiar with in-game advertising.

As a marketing channel, it’s still in its infancy.

But as a medium, it’s ripe for stunts like Warner Bros. partnering with Fortnite for the first-ever in-game movie night.

The advice from brands and studios is simple:

“The major mistake that people make is to take the assumptions about other forms of media and try to take it into the world of gaming,” David Messinger, CMO of Activision Blizzard.

“You have to take your time, approach things properly and build out to those big bets,” Douglas Veney, influencer and esports marketing manager at Nestlé.

Featured image by Miguel Orós on Unsplash